Prosecutor Abuse – A Seaver’s News Short – 02.19.2017 Updated February 22, 2017 at 6:56 am

Prosecutor Abuse – A Seaver’s News Short – 02.19.2017

A Seaver’s News Short*

United States Prosecutors, from King County Washington through-out the fruited plain – setting people up – it is what they do, it is who they are and it is the preferred method of choice in courtrooms across the country. To be sure, quoting Prosecutor David Seaver, it is in the “news” everyday.

Of course, Prosecutor Dan Satterberg does it with, and I quote, “humility.” Like the law givers of old Prosecutor Dan Satterberg is publicity proud of his humility. 1And when you pray, do not be like the hypocrites, for they love to pray standing in the synagogues and on the street corners to be seen by men. I tell you the truth, they have received their reward in full. (Matthew 6:5)

those who with a word make a man out to be guilty, who ensnare the defender in court and with false testimony deprive the innocent of justice.   (Isaiah 29:21) 

Bonus: Just, more in the “news” that King County Prosecutor David Seavers should read with enabler Judge Lori K. Smith.

Lesson: Therefore, O house of Israel, I will judge you, each one according to his ways, declares the Sovereign Lord . Repent! Turn away from all your offenses; then sin will not be your downfall. (Ezekiel 18:30)

Note: Just as New Orleans Prosecutors, in-spite of evidence (facts), did as King County Prosecutor Mark Larson did do. Across the United States there is an epidemic of Prosecutor obstruction of justice.

*A Seaver News Short: “It takes only passing familiarity with recent news…” King County Prosecutor David Seaver, Washington State before Appeals Judges Tweedle-dee, Twiddle-dumb and Twiddle-thumbs. See for the gory details.

____________________________________________________________ ~ opinion unto righteousness ~ timothy williams
Sunday, February 19, 2017

6King County Washington State, King County Courts, King County Prosecutors,

Article Reference


He had no previous convictions, and by the time of his trial, another man had already been convicted of Julie’s murder. But Jones was to spend the next 24 years of his life locked up in Louisiana’s most terrifying prisons for crimes that even the lawyers who convicted him knew he had not committed.

It was not until the end of January this year that New Orleans prosecutors, who for years hid evidence proving Jones’s innocence, finally announced they would not seek a retrial, following his victory on appeal.