160 Legal Years Later Updated March 7, 2017 at 2:08 pm

160 Legal Years Later


On Monday, the 160-year anniversary of the decision, Charles Taney IV of Greenwich, Connecticut, stood a few feet from a statue of his great-great-grand-uncle Roger Brooke Taney outside the Maryland State House and apologized for the decision, in which Roger Taney wrote that African-Americans could not have rights of their own and were inferior to white people. [reference article below]


Corrupt Prosecutors around the county such as King County Prosecutor Dan Satterberg of Washington State know that any “corrections,” “apologies” or “errors” are legal years away from their corruption. Thus the team of Judge Lori K. Smith, Prosecutor Dan Satterberg, Prosecutor Jason Simmons, Prosecutor Rich Anderson, Prosecutor Lisa Johnson, Prosecutor Mark Larson: King County Washington State manipulated the hate crime – to put it mildly.

So goes “humble” King County Prosecutor Dan Satterberg.

Therefore the law is paralyzed, and justice never prevails. The wicked hem in the righteous, so that justice is perverted.  (Habakkuk 1:4)

Forgetting the blood of the Civil War caused by the courts…

Forgetting the Slavery and Jim Crow caused by the courts…

Forgetting the KKK caused by the courts …fast-forded to the modern day hate-crimes, aka, lynchings caused by Prosecutors around the country…

Bonus: As the team of Judge Lori K. Smith, Prosecutor Dan Satterberg, Prosecutor Jason Simmons, Prosecutor Rich Anderson, Prosecutor Lisa Johnson, Prosecutor Mark Larson all agreed – “So what.” Indeed, “So what” because any justice done is legal years removed from those who inject injustice into legal procedures.

This legal years injustice is something that Prosecutor Dan Satterberg understands all too well.

This is how lawful laws are paralyzed and how, maybe, just maybe 160 years from now Satterberg’s family will “apologize.”

 

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enumclaw.com ~ opinion unto righteousness ~ timothy williams
Tuesday, March 7, 2017

Article Reference

(foxnews.com)—A family member of the chief justice who presided over the Supreme Court in the Dred Scott decision has apologized to the family of the slave who tried to sue for his freedom.

On Monday, the 160-year anniversary of the decision, Charles Taney IV of Greenwich, Connecticut, stood a few feet from a statue of his great-great-grand-uncle Roger Brooke Taney outside the Maryland State House and apologized for the decision, in which Roger Taney wrote that African-Americans could not have rights of their own and were inferior to white people. Roger Taney lived in Maryland.

“You can’t hide from the words that Taney wrote,” Taney said. “You can’t run, you can’t hide, you can’t look away. You have to face them.”