“Cult of Clean Eating”

“Cult of Clean Eating”

Dairy – a major source of calcium, which protects the bones – was one of the key food groups targeted.

She said: “When I was growing up, my meals weren’t photographed and shared on social media. The pressure young women are under to match what their idols on Instagram are eating is really high.”

In total more than 20 per cent of those such age had cut or severely restricted intake of milk or cheese.

This group were far more likely than older adults to be getting their information about health and diets from blogs, vlogs and other social media.

[reference article below]
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The man who fears God will avoid all extremes .  (Ecclesiastes 7:18) 

Lesson: Unless you are John the Baptist and God has commanded you to eat only locus and wild honey fear God and eat properly.

The pressure young women are under to match what their idols on Instagram are eating is really high. [reference article below]

Warning: God commands all friends of His to “flee idolatry” even those on Instagram.

  • Therefore, my dear friends, flee from idolatry. (1 Corinthians 10:14)

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Article Reference

(telegraph.co.uk)—Professor Susan Lanham-New, Clinical Advisor to the National Osteoporosis Society and Professor of Nutrition at the University of Surrey, says: “Diet in early adulthood is so important because by the time we get into our late twenties it is too late to reverse the damage caused by poor diet and nutrient deficiencies and the opportunity to build strong bones has passed.”

Half of all women and one in five men develop osteoporosis after the age of 50. Broken bones, also known as fractures, caused by osteoporosis can be very painful and slow to recover from.

A poor diet for those in their teens and early twenties now could see a significant rise in the numbers of people suffering fractures and the complications associated with them in the future.

 

Read More on telegraph.co.uk