Gustave Courbet

Gustave Courbet

The self-proclaimed “proudest and most arrogant man in France,”  – Gustave Courbet (1819–1877)

Gustave Courbet
Self-proclaimed as the “proudest and most arrogant man in France,” Gustave Courbet left quite a mark on the art world, becoming central to the emergence of Realism in the mid-nineteenth century. Courbet rejected traditional and classical styles of the French Academy, and rather insisted on painting the physical reality of the subjects and objects he observed- specifically the social and political imbalances he witnessed in French society. He believed the goal of the Realist painter was the pursuit of the truth, which would help to blur class boundaries and social contradictions. Courbet’s career – although scandalous and controversial – left a powerful legacy for other artists and made him a pioneering figure in the history of modernism.

[ reference article below ]


Gustave Courbet might self-proclaim to be the proudest and the most arrogant man in France, but give me Moses anytime.

(Now Moses was a very humble man, more humble than anyone else on the face of the earth.) (Numbers 12:3)

Lesson:

Moses or Gustave Courbet

Moses was so humble, rather, had been humbled and re-born to be humble from the power of the Living God that he, Moses, could write, “Now Moses was a very humble man…”

Sure beats artist Gustave Courbet who fell for the devil’s pride hook, line and stinker.

Bonus:

This humility of Moses and from true Christianity, self-proclaimed humble minister of justice by none-other-than Seattle’s own King County Washington State Prosecutor Dan Satterberg knows nothing about.

Indeed, if King County Prosecutors see such God-given humility not only do they consider it strange, they prosecute it. Prosecute it to the dark tune of lying about the number of passports at a bond hearing. From then on King County Courts and Prosecutors stopped their ears to facts of evidence – so the hate crime went. [ reference article below ]

Why is my language not clear to you?

Because you are unable to hear what I say. You belong to your father, the devil, and you want to carry out your father’s desire. He was a murderer from the beginning, not holding to the truth, for there is no truth in him. When he lies, he speaks his native language, for he is a liar and the father of lies.

Yet because I tell the truth, you do not believe me! (John 8:43-45)

No wonder King County Prosecutor David Seaver labors hard to keep a secret police that works on behalf of King County Prosecutor Dan Satterberg.

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opinion unto righteousness ~ enumclaw.com ~ timothy williams
[ proverbs 18:2 ]

Article Reference

(metmuseum.org)—Gustave Courbet (1819–1877)

Self-proclaimed as the “proudest and most arrogant man in France,” Gustave Courbet left quite a mark on the art world, becoming central to the emergence of Realism in the mid-nineteenth century. Courbet rejected traditional and classical styles of the French Academy, and rather insisted on painting the physical reality of the subjects and objects he observed- specifically the social and political imbalances he witnessed in French society. He believed the goal of the Realist painter was the pursuit of the truth, which would help to blur class boundaries and social contradictions. Courbet’s career – although scandalous and controversial – left a powerful legacy for other artists and made him a pioneering figure in the history of modernism.

That same year, Courbet flouted the authority of the state—not for the first time—by publicly refusing the award of the Legion of Honor, declaring his independence from any form of government. Since the time of its creation, Courbet’s Realist imagery—from the downtrodden laborers of The Stonebreakers (1849–50) to the rural bourgeoisie of Ornans—had prompted political associations, but the artist’s actual engagement with politics was complex. He called himself a “republican by birth” but did not take up arms during the 1848 Revolution, adhering to his pacifist beliefs. He entered the political arena on the eve of the Paris Commune of 1871 and played an active role in the political and artistic life of this short-lived socialist government.

 

Gustave Courbet (1819–1877) With Humilty Prosecutor Dan SatterbergRead More on en.wikipedia.org