Setter Ups Setting Up

Setter Ups Setting Up

From Washington State to Washington D.C. it is all “So what” to setups. Not smart as it destroys a nation and with it all peace.

  • “Show me the man,” says any federal prosecutor, “and I can show you the crime.” This is not an exaggeration. – Cato Institute, 2010

So they sent for Jeroboam, and he and the whole assembly of Israel went to Rehoboam and said to him: “Your father put a heavy yoke on us, but now lighten the harsh labor and the heavy yoke he put on us, and we will serve you.” Rehoboam answered, “Go away for three days and then come back to me.” So the people went away.

Then King Rehoboam consulted the elders who had served his father Solomon during his lifetime. “How would you advise me to answer these people?” he asked. They replied, “If today you will be a servant to these people and serve them and give them a favorable answer, they will always be your servants.”

But Rehoboam rejected the advice the elders gave him and consulted the young men who had grown up with him and were serving him. He asked them, “What is your advice? How should we answer these people who say to me, ‘Lighten the yoke your father put on us’?” The young men who had grown up with him replied, “Tell these people who have said to you, ‘Your father put a heavy yoke on us, but make our yoke lighter’-tell them, ‘My little finger is thicker than my father’s waist. My father laid on you a heavy yoke; I will make it even heavier. My father scourged you with whips; I will scourge you with scorpions.’ ”

Three days later Jeroboam and all the people returned to Rehoboam, as the king had said, “Come back to me in three days.” The king answered the people harshly. Rejecting the advice given him by the elders, he followed the advice of the young men and said, “My father made your yoke heavy; I will make it even heavier. My father scourged you with whips; I will scourge you with scorpions.” (1 Kings 12:3-14)

 

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opinion unto righteousness ~ enumclaw.com ~ timothy williams
[ proverbs 18:2 ]

 

Article Reference

(cato.org)—January/February 2010
The Criminalization of Almost Everything
When laws grow so voluminous and vague that they oppress those who live under them, society can become as unlivable as if it were lawless. Subject to the arbitrary scrutiny of prosecutors overcome by ambition for their own 15 minutes of fame, ordinary citizens face the horrors of becoming criminal defendants. At a Cato Book Forum in October, Harvey Silverglate, author of Three Felonies a Day, and Tim Lynch, editor of In the Name of Justice and director of Cato’s Project on Criminal Justice, discussed the growing threat of federal criminal law.
HARVEY SILVERGLATE: An average, busy professional gets up in the morning, gets the kids to school, goes to work, uses the telephone or e-mail, has meetings, works on a prospectus or bank loan, goes home, puts the kids to bed, has dinner, reads the newspaper, goes to sleep, and has no idea that, in the course of that day, he or she has very likely committed three felonies. Three felonies that some ambitious, creative prosecutor can pick out from that day’s activities and put into an indictment.
In his foreword to my book, Alan Dershowitz discusses his time litigating cases in the old Soviet Union. He was always taken by the fact that they could prosecute anybody they wanted because some of the statutes were so vague. Dershowitz points out that this was a technique developed by Beria, the infamous sidekick of Stalin, who said, “Show me the man and I’ll find you the crime.” That really is something that has survived the Soviet Union and has arrived in the good old USA. “Show me the man,” says any federal prosecutor, “and I can show you the crime.” This is not an exaggeration.
How does this play out in the United States? To some extent, the weapon is aimed at unpopular citizens and groups. It isn’t the primary impetus, but it is certainly a tool, for example, for going after Muslims or any political opponents who seem to be standing in the way of a prosecutor’s political ambitions. For the most part, though, these prosecutions are random. They sometimes have to do with the ambitions of prosecutors and sometimes there are prosecutors who think it’s their job to clean up the world or country. But, fundamentally, I don’t understand the motives behind the use of these weapons. I’m not a sociologist, I’m not a psychiatrist or psychologist, I can just tell you that these weapons are sprung with alarming and increasing frequency.
I predict that we will see, in the next couple of years, a tidal wave of prosecutions growing out of the financial crisis. Different people from different perspectives have different explanations of why we had a crash. But the Department of Justice is going to have figured it out: fraudulent individuals caused all this. It had nothing to do with government regulation. It had nothing to do with culture. It was individuals who have committed crimes that caused all our woes.

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