Police Body Cam Sham Study

Police Body Cam Sham Study

But a study released Friday reveals that body cameras have little to no effect on police behavior. Officers wearing the devices act similarly to those who don’t, the study concludes.

And there is no significant difference in citizen complaints about camera-wearing officers versus those without cameras, the study says.

[ see reference article ]


What a sham of a study.

Aw, gee whiz sounds like we all need to drop the body cam thing on police, doesn’t it?

However, the sham in this police body cam article is what the study did not reveal nor examine.

This “study” did not examine the success when it came to ligation, thus helping the little people prove misconduct.

My guess, and your guess is it helps prove police misconduct and thus the article seeks to stop the proliferation of this evidence.

That the study proved nothing changes police behavior – yea really?!

Nothing will change police behavior until hiring practices are altered.

Such only underscores the privileged, we-are-a-specially-protected group mentality that permeates current police and prosecutor unites.

Remember the article where just graduated police cadets trashed a bar explaining, “We can do what we want – we are police officers now.”?

Do not deny justice to your poor people in their lawsuits. (Exodus 23:6)

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Article Reference

(foxnews.com)—Prompted in part by high-profile complaints about police use of force, the U.S. government in recent years has allocated tens of millions of taxpayer dollars for body cameras for state and local police departments – and those states and municipalities have invested millions of their own dollars as well.

But a study released Friday reveals that body cameras have little to no effect on police behavior. Officers wearing the devices act similarly to those who don’t, the study concludes.

And there is no significant difference in citizen complaints about camera-wearing officers versus those without cameras, the study says.

“Evidence of their effectiveness is limited,” researchers David Yokum, Anita Ravishankar and Alexander Coppock conclude about the cameras in their report, titled, “Evaluating the Effects of Police Body-Worn Cameras.”

The study tracked more than 2,000 Washington, D.C., police officers – half with cameras, half without – for 18 months. The research team then tallied their use-of-force situations, civilian complaints against them, etc., and examined whether cameras affected the results.

But every measure showed the differences to be insignificant.

“The results call into question whether police departments should even be adopting body-worn cameras, especially given their high cost,” Harlan Yu, a consultant with Upturn, a Washington nonprofit that examines technology’s effect on society, told the New York Times. Yu’s group was not involved in the study, the Times says. – Fox News