Dad Power

Dad Power

Dad power: The surprising new science of fatherhood
When Anna Machin realised science was skewed towards mums, she set out to change that – and discovered fatherhood comes with a raft of changes to the mind and body – New Scientist

[ see reference article and link(s) below ]
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Man at the end of the day is dust.

A Father started from the dust in the ground.

Man, being made from weakness itself needs God – desperately.

…the Lord God formed the man from the dust of the ground and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life, and the man became a living being. (Genesis 2:7)

 Ten years on, we now know that men undergo significant biological changes with fatherhood. And although much of the research so far has looked at heterosexual, nuclear families, it seems many of the findings apply to anyone in a father role. Then, once the baby arrives, a man can expect his testosterone levels to nosedive. This change is permanent. – Anna Machin, New Scientist

Bonus Wisdom:

I know!

I know! …raising my hand in class.

I know why and how to fix the problem!

 What really interests Machin as an anthropologist is that Couvade syndrome seems to appear only in industrialised countries. No one yet knows exactly what causes it, but she believes it is the result of fathers having a diminished role in such societies. – Anna Machin, New Scientist

Ms. Anna Machin is on the correct path as to why.

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Opinion Unto Righteousness
www.enumclaw.com / Proverbs 18:2 / Timothy Williams

Concept of Enumclaw.com
Wednesday.28.March.2018

Article Reference

(newscientist.com)—Until recently, the prevailing theory was that, because men don’t experience the hormonal changes that women do, they couldn’t develop depression, says Machin. But men are affected by other hormonal changes. A man’s testosterone level drops once he becomes a father, for example. “Testosterone is a protector against depression, so if you have a particularly big drop when you become a dad, then you are at risk,” says Machin.

A man’s well-being can be affected before his baby is born, too. Take, for example, Couvade syndrome, sometimes called sympathetic pregnancy. It is a mysterious set of ailments sometimes experienced by male partners of pregnant women. “Men who have it seem to be experiencing some sort of reaction to their partner’s pregnancy,” says Machin. “It’s generally being very tired, possibly putting on weight and having digestive issues. Bizarrely, toothache is one of the symptoms, and you get a lot of headaches and things like that.”

What really interests Machin as an anthropologist is that Couvade syndrome seems to appear only in industrialised countries. No one yet knows exactly what causes it, but she believes it is the result of fathers having a diminished role in such societies.

It is crucial that dads are recognised as being vulnerable to health problems, and that they are offered support through the pregnancy and beyond, says Machin. That’s all the more important given that fathers have an impact on their child’s development. “I think if we were more inclusive and placed more value on the fathers in our society, you would see less Couvade and poor mental health in fathers.”