Facebook : “Secret Mission”

Facebook : “Secret Mission”

But as recently as last month, the company was talking to several health organizations, including Stanford Medical School and American College of Cardiology, about signing the data-sharing agreement.

While the data shared would obscure personally identifiable information, such as the patient’s name, Facebook proposed using a common computer science technique called “hashing” to match individuals who existed in both sets. Facebook says the data would have been used only for research conducted by the medical community.

[ see reference article and link(s) below ]
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Really? Who would have thought Facebook was stealing, abusing and manipulating extremely personal information?

Like a coating of glaze over earthenware are fervent lips with an evil heart. (Proverbs 26:23)

Facebook, Mark Zuckerberg, now there is a glaze of earthenware.

Besides, never, ever, trust a billionaire whose idea of grown-up dress-up is a grey t-shirt and jeans.

 

 

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Opinion Unto Righteousness
www.enumclaw.com / Proverbs 18:2 / Timothy Williams

Concept of Enumclaw.com
Thursday.05.April.2018

Article Reference

(cnbc.com)—Facebook said on Wednesday that as many as 87 million people’s data might have been shared this way. The company has recently announced new privacy policies and controls meant to restrict the type of data it collects and shares, and how that data can be used.

Facebook’s pitch, according to two people who heard it and one who is familiar with the project, was to combine what a health system knows about its patients (such as: person has heart disease, is age 50, takes 2 medications and made 3 trips to the hospital this year) with what Facebook knows (such as: user is age 50, married with 3 kids, English isn’t a primary language, actively engages with the community by sending a lot of messages).

The project would then figure out if this combined information could improve patient care, initially with a focus on cardiovascular health. For instance, if Facebook could determine that an elderly patient doesn’t have many nearby close friends or much community support, the health system might decide to send over a nurse to check in after a major surgery.

The people declined to be named as they were asked to sign confidentiality agreements.