Study Finds: Reading Out-Loud

Study Finds: Reading Out-Loud

According to new research from the University of Waterloo, one of the best ways to commit information to long-term memory is to read the text out loud. Why? It is something like getting more bang for the buck. We see the information and we hear the information. The dual action of speaking as well as hearing oneself saying it helps our memories grasp and hang onto information.

[ see reference article and link(s) below ]

Jesus said become as a child if you hunger and thirst for righteousness.

Such is the Kingdom of God that all are as little children before the loving God.

And, oh how little children love to hear books out-loud so from time to time I just read the Word of God, the Good Book, out-loud with my lips.

With my lips I recount all the laws that come from your mouth. (Psalm 119:13)

[ Bonus Wisdom ]

Naturally when I read the Word out-loud not only do I engage my lips, but my spirit, my mind, my soul and my strength. Indeed, my ears are atuned, not iTuned to some iPod, to the voice of the Holy Spirit which teaches me to understand the Word of God.

This an’t no religion or bed-time story ~ it is a cry to understand, to obey, to be renewed according to His truthful Word.

May my cry come before you, O Lord ; give me understanding according to your word. (Psalm 119:169)

 

Reviewed Unto Righteousness
www.enumclaw.com | Proverbs 18:2 | Timothy Williams
Concept of Enumclaw.com

 

Article Reference

(studyfinds.org)—Researchers tested 95 participants, using a variety of methods to learn written information. The four options tried were reading silently, hearing someone else read, listening to a recording of oneself reading and reading aloud in real time. The authors found that reading information aloud to oneself in real time was the most effective way participants retained information.

This research builds on previous studies that showed how activities, such as writing or typing words, aided overall memory retention. Researchers say that their new study helps explain how our own speech builds memories. It it is our own story, essentially, and we can relate to it as we hear it spoken by our own voice.