“Eye Contact”

“Eye Contact”

“If we don’t do things like eye contact really well—for example, how frequently does the robot make eye contact with a person, or how long does he keep that eye contact—then something what feels like an alive character immediately feels not alive or very detached like a turtle or or a hamster or something like that, versus a toddler or a dog,” says Tappeiner.

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Would like to have one of these cute robots, but I stay far, far, far away from these eyes.

For these commands are a lamp, this teaching is a light, and the corrections of discipline are the way to life, keeping you from the immoral woman, from the smooth tongue of the wayward wife. Do not lust in your heart after her beauty or let her captivate you with her eyes, (Proverbs 6:23-25)

Reviewed Unto Righteousness
www.enumclaw.com | Proverbs 18:2 | Timothy Williams
Concept of Enumclaw.com

Article Reference

(wired.com)—Communication also comes nonverbally from Vector’s digitized eyes, which are meticulously animated by former Pixar wizards to woo you. They express the robot’s “emotional” state—tip it on its side and it looks flustered, for instance—but also reel you in, because humans live for eye contact, even with machines.

“If we don’t do things like eye contact really well—for example, how frequently does the robot make eye contact with a person, or how long does he keep that eye contact—then something what feels like an alive character immediately feels not alive or very detached like a turtle or or a hamster or something like that, versus a toddler or a dog,” says Tappeiner.

Let’s be real: No one’s interested in a digital turtle. But it’s not totally clear that consumers want a digital dog, either (especially one that tromps around on a tabletop). And customers have been burned before. “They expected too much and got too little,” says Aditya Kaul, research director at Tractica, which studies consumer robotics. “That has something to do with science fiction and popular culture and what we expect to see from robots is not really what we are getting.”