Women Breadwinner Depression

Women Breadwinner Depression

Women More Likely To Feel Depressed As Breadwinner,

The researchers first found that men’s well-being decreased once they had left the workforce to tend to household matters, while the inverse wasn’t true for women. In fact, their findings showed that women who became the breadwinner of their family reported more symptoms of depression. -Study Finds

[reference article below]

Litteraly cannot keep up with the God is right again…

You must teach what is in accord with sound doctrine. Teach the older men to be temperate, worthy of respect, self-controlled, and sound in faith, in love and in endurance. Likewise, teach the older women to be reverent in the way they live, not to be slanderers or addicted to much wine, but to teach what is good. Then they can train the younger women to love their husbands and children, to be self-controlled and pure, to be busy at home, to be kind, and to be subject to their husbands, so that no one will malign the word of God. Similarly, encourage the young men to be self-controlled. (Titus 2:1-6)

Bonus:

Gee, wonder where the children learned they could be betrayed for the sake of careers, self-advancement and of course good-old sent away to public school?

“Brother will betray brother to death, and a father his child; children will rebel against their parents and have them put to death. (Matthew 10:21)

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enumclaw.com ~ opinion unto righteousness ~ timothy williams
[proverbs 18:2]

Wednesday, August 23, 2017

Article Reference

(studyfinds.org)—The researchers first found that men’s well-being decreased once they had left the workforce to tend to household matters, while the inverse wasn’t true for women. In fact, their findings showed that women who became the breadwinner of their family reported more symptoms of depression. “We observed a statistically significant and substantial difference in depressive symptoms between men and women in our study,” says lead researcher Karen Kramer in a news release. “The results supported the overarching hypothesis: well-being was lower for mothers and fathers who violated gendered expectations about the division of paid labor, and higher for parents who conformed to these expectations.”