Science: Write It Down

Science: Write It Down

Writing about positive emotions may help to reduce stress and anxiety, according to our new study, published in the British Journal of Health Psychology.

Earlier research has also found that writing about negative emotions – getting things “off your chest” – can improve your mental health. And it seems to benefit physical health, too. Stress affects your physical health, so it is thought that improvements in mental well-being might stop people becoming physically unwell.

Research has shown that writing about negative emotions can lead to fewer visits to the doctor, fewer self-reported symptoms of ill health, and less time off work due to ill health.

[ see reference article and link(s) below ]

God, right, or rather, write again.

Hear, O Israel: The Lord our God, the Lord is one. Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your strength.

These commandments that I give you today are to be upon your hearts. Impress them on your children. Talk about them when you sit at home and when you walk along the road, when you lie down and when you get up. Tie them as symbols on your hands and bind them on your foreheads.

Write them on the doorframes of your houses and on your gates. (Deuteronomy 6:4-9) 

[ Bonus Wisdom ]

Don’t forget to write down all the good things of the Living God upon the tablet of your heart.

My son, keep my words and store up my commands within you. Keep my commands and you will live; guard my teachings as the apple of your eye.

Bind them on your fingers; write them on the tablet of your heart. (Proverbs 7:1-3)

Reviewed Unto Righteousness
www.enumclaw.com | Proverbs 18:2 | Timothy Williams
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Article Reference

(sciencealert.com)—Stress and anxiety decreased to a significantly greater extent for those who wrote about positive experiences after four weeks, compared with the levels reported before they completed the writing tasks. However, writing didn’t improve participants’ physical health problems. We also found that writing about happy moments was effective, regardless of the levels of distress that people reported at the start of the study.