Trauma of War Become Increasingly Religious

Trauma of War Become Increasingly Religious

“In addition, the researchers found that those who experienced the trauma of war were likelier to attend religious services and were likelier to rank religion as being significant in their lives than those who were not. And in some cases, those effects were surprisingly long-live”

[Study shows that many who experience trauma of war become increasingly religious]

[ Reviewed Unto Righteousness Below ]

While becoming religious is not that same as a viable relationship with the Living God the study demonstrates the love and wisdom of a holy God.

None of this will make any sense to those who object to the necessity of hell.

Then another horse came out, a fiery red one.

Its rider was given power to take peace from the earth and to make people kill each other.

To him was given a large sword.

(Revelation 6:4)

Mankind is already under the justified sentence of hell and the sword is the starting point of that execution.

Remember that a flaming sword was placed at the entrance to the Tree of Life that Adam and Eve may not enter back in.

This large sword of war is that mankind might wake-up, seek God and repent.

  •  Then the LORD God said, “Behold, the man has become like one of Us, to know good and evil. And now, lest he put out his hand and take also of the tree of life, and eat, and live forever”–  therefore the LORD God sent him out of the garden of Eden to till the ground from which he was taken.  So He drove out the man; and He placed cherubim at the east of the garden of Eden, and a flaming sword which turned every way, to guard the way to the tree of life.
    (Genesis 3:22-24)

 

Reviewed Unto Righteousness
www.enumclaw.com | Proverbs 18:2 | Timothy Williams
Concept of Enumclaw.com

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“It’s been said that there are no atheists in foxholes, but a new study led by Joseph Henrich has shown that the impact of war on religion extends well beyond the front lines.

The chair of the Department of Human and Evolutionary Biology, Henrich and a team of international collaborators gathered survey data from several locations around the globe and found that, following the trauma of seeing a friend or loved one killed or injured during conflict, many became more religious. The study is described in a Jan. 28 paper published in Nature Human Behavior.

“I became interested in this question through my prior work, which has been focused on how religious beliefs can cause people to cooperate more in a group,” Henrich said. “The idea is that if you can expand the sphere of cooperation, then that group can more successfully compete against others, sometimes even through violent conflict.

“But this study suggests that this could lead to a vicious circle,” Henrich continued. “If you receive a war shock and become very religious, and then begin to outcompete other groups through conflict, that could result in a runaway effect.”

To understand the relationship between war and religion, Henrich and his colleagues gathered data from more than 1,700 interviews with people in 71 villages scattered throughout Sierra Leone, Tajikistan, and Uganda. Their results showed that, among those who were most exposed to war, membership in religious groups increased by 12, 14, and 41 percentage points, respectively.

In addition, the researchers found that those who experienced the trauma of war were likelier to attend religious services and were likelier to rank religion as being significant in their lives than those who were not. And in some cases, those effects were surprisingly long-lived.”

[Study shows that many who experience trauma of war become increasingly religious]