Mockingbird Watch

Mockingbird Watch

Northern Mockingbird

This around-the-clock songster doesn’t just copy the sounds other birds make.

Northern Mockingbirds mimic other things, too – even inanimate objects, like machinery.

[Northern Mockingbird | Attracting Birds – Birds and Blooms]

[ Reviewed Unto Righteousness Below ]

Spring is here and it time for bird-watching.

Do not be deceived: God cannot be mocked.

A man reaps what he sows.

The one who sows to please his sinful nature, from that nature will reap destruction;

the one who sows to please the Spirit, from the Spirit will reap eternal life.

(Galatians 6:7-8)

A lot of folks make noise like the Bible but are merely mocking what they have heard.

For all you equality types “both sexes are alike” and never shut-up long enough for the Holy Spirit to speak as both are “nearly incessant” in their mocking. Indeed, mockers avoid anyone who is actually making sense from the heart of God. As the Good Book states: Mockers resent correction, so they avoid the wise. (Proverbs 15:12)

The sexes are alike. This bird’s voice more than makes up for its plumage. It is loud, clear and—in spring and summer—nearly incessant.

[Northern Mockingbird » Bird Watcher’s Digest]

Reviewed Unto Righteousness
www.enumclaw.com | Proverbs 18:2 | Timothy Williams
Concept of Enumclaw.com

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Article Reference

(birdwatchersdigest.com)—

Look for

The mockingbird is fairly large (9 to 11 inches long) with medium-gray upperparts and a pale breast and belly. Its long tail is edged in white, and there are prominent white patches on the wings that are especially visible in flight. The bill and legs are black. The sexes are alike. This bird’s voice more than makes up for its plumage. It is loud, clear and—in spring and summer—nearly incessant.

Listen for

When the moon is bright, mockingbirds will sing at night. The mockingbird tends to repeat each phrase three times before moving on to the next. Both males and females sing. Its rich, warbling voice and uncanny ability to imitate the calls of other birds—not to mention rusty hinges, frogs, dogs, and squeaky wheels—make it a superstar in any avian chorus. Individual Northern Mockingbirds may use more than 200 different songs and sounds, including those of birds and other animals and mechanical sounds. Most common call is a harsh tchapp! Five different states have chosen this popular songster as their state bird!

[Northern Mockingbird » Bird Watcher’s Digest]