Venezuela | Strange, Joyful Sound

Venezuela | Strange, Joyful Sound

“CARACAS, Venezuela – The lights in Petare had gone dark. Again.

The people of Venezuela’s largest slum were used to the blackouts that halt the flow of water, exhaust their supplies of expensive candles and fray their already thin patience.

But this would not be like any other lightless night in the hillside barrio. Amid the darkened alleyways, a strange, joyful sound emerged between the zinc-roofed homes. Tambourines jingled, maracas rattled, drums throbbed. Voices called all who could hear to salvation.

“Cristo sana y salva . . .” 10 members of the Restoring Hearts church sang against the darkness. “Christ heals and saves. . . .””

[Short on electricity, food and water, Venezuelans return to religion – Alton Telegraph]

[ Reviewed Unto Righteousness Below ]

  • But this would not be like any other lightless night in the hillside barrio. Amid the darkened alleyways, a strange, joyful sound emerged between the zinc-roofed homes. Tambourines jingled, maracas rattled, drums throbbed. Voices called all who could hear to salvation. – Alton Telegraph

Why does God send hardship?

The answer is found in the courage and strange, joyful sound.

God did this so that men would seek him
and perhaps reach out for him and find him,
though he is not far from each one of us.

(Acts 17:27)

 


Timothy Williams

Reviewed Unto Righteousness
www.enumclaw.com | Proverbs 18:2 | Timothy Williams
Concept of Enumclaw.com


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“”We comfort them, but we also must denounce evil when we see it,” he said. “We cannot be an accomplice to injustice.”

Pentecostal pastor Carlos Vielma has watched attendance in his Caracas congregation explode in the past 18 months to nearly 3,000 at three services each week. He preaches regularly about discernment to combat disinformation and propaganda.

“It’s impossible not to talk about the situation from the pulpit,” Vielma said. “We are all living the same thing. We can’t avoid it, but we are encouraging, empowering and comforting them in the process.”

Maduro has taken note. In an unusual service broadcast on state television in January, he called himself a “true Christian leader,” and asked Venezuelans to pray for him.

Jaime Palacios, a professor of philosophy at Andrés Bello Catholic University in Caracas, says churches, synagogues and mosques are plugged into the social and economic challenges of the communities they serve, and can be organizing bodies for political action.

In this South American country of 30 million, signs of collapse are everywhere. Children and adults pick food out of rotting garbage heaps. Hospitals ask patients to buy and bring their own IV bags and gloves to surgery. Teenagers have been shot to death in their homes by masked men.

The country is divided and deadlocked. Maduro claimed victory in elections last year widely viewed as fraudulent. Guaidó declared himself interim president in January.

Leidy Villegas says her Christian faith helps her confront reality. She can barely afford food for her family, and can’t find clean water every day. But the idea that there is something bigger and more powerful than her country’s crisis drove her to sing with her church in Petare.

“We found happiness for a few hours and went home joyful,” the 34-year-old mother of four said. “We even forgot about the blackout for a while.

“We know worse days are coming our way, but just like we did that day, we always find refuge in God’s glory,” she said.”

[Short on electricity, food and water, Venezuelans return to religion – Alton Telegraph]