American Tick Invasion

American Tick Invasion

“Thomas Mather, Ph.D., director of the University of Rhode Island’s Center for Vector-Borne Disease, has been studying ticks since 1983. He’s known as “The Tick Guy,” and says that over the years he may have collected more black-legged ticks than anyone. The recent rise in tick populations is something Mather has observed firsthand.

“If people could just see what I’m seeing,” he says, “they would never go outside.””

[The Great American Tick Invasion – Consumer Reports]


[ Reviewed Unto Righteousness Below ]


“If people could just see what I’m seeing,” he says, “they would never go outside.”” – Thomas Mather, Ph.D


“Disease-carrying ticks, found in all 50 states, have significantly increased their geographical range in the past 15 years, showing up in new places nearly every year and multiplying quickly.

Tick experts in the Northeast have stories about places so infested with ticks that they’re hesitant to name them, not wanting to brand a place as “Tick Heaven.” A Long Island entomologist recalled finding 250 ticks on a single bush. Last year a report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention showed that the number of tick-borne diseases more than doubled between 2004 and 2016.

Scientists are testing new approaches that may help curb the explosion of tick-borne illnesses, such as Lyme disease and babesiosis. But there are no large-scale tick-control solutions demonstrated to work, according to Richard Ostfeld, Ph.D., a disease ecologist at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Millbrook, N.Y. In the meantime, people are left to protect themselves against the serious threat of disease using the same precautions taken at the Little Leaf school.

Thomas Mather, Ph.D., director of the University of Rhode Island’s Center for Vector-Borne Disease, has been studying ticks since 1983. He’s known as “The Tick Guy,” and says that over the years he may have collected more black-legged ticks than anyone. The recent rise in tick populations is something Mather has observed firsthand. “If people could just see what I’m seeing,” he says, “they would never go outside.”
A Growing Epidemic

In a recent nationally representative survey of 2,052 Americans by Consumer Reports, 4 in 10 said they had experienced a tick bite. But many more are bitten without ever realizing it. Today, the CDC estimates that there are about 300,000 new cases of Lyme disease in the U.S. each year, most of them unreported.

And Lyme is just the best-known tick-borne illness. At least seven new diseases spread by ticks have emerged since 2004. (See “How a Tick Bite Can Affect Your Health.”) Some can be fatal if not caught early.

Ticks aren’t the only disease-spreading pests on the move. A study published in March predicts that as the world warms, a billion new people could be exposed to mosquito-borne diseases such as Zika, dengue, and chikungunya between now and 2080.

When disease-carrying mosquitoes reach a new area in the U.S., there are standard public health responses, including population control methods, with cities, towns, and counties conducting mosquito abatement campaigns. But when ticks move in, you’re often on your own.

And the problem shows no sign of abating: “The continued spread of ticks, the discovery of new tick-borne pathogens, and the spreading outbreak of human disease is a near certainty,” the Tick-Borne Disease Working Group, appointed by Congress, wrote in a report in 2018.”

[The Great American Tick Invasion – Consumer Reports]


“The Most Effective Tick Repellents for Humans (and Dogs), According to Science”

[13 Most Effective Tick Repellents According to Science 2019]




Timothy Williams

Reviewed Unto Righteousness
www.enumclaw.com | Proverbs 18:2 | Timothy Williams
Concept of Enumclaw.com


[ additional information ]

“Female western black-legged tick, Ixodes pacificus, can transmit Borrelia burgdorferi, the bacteria that causes Lyme disease. These ticks are mainly found in western Washington and live in forested or brushy areas.”

[Tick Photo Gallery :: Washington State Department of Health]

Article Reference

(consumerreports.org)—

Lyme Disease

What is Lyme disease?

Lyme disease is a bacterial disease caused by Borrelia burgdorferi. Typical symptoms include a characteristic “bull’s-eye” (target) shaped rash along with fever, headache, and muscle or joint pain. Not everyone with Lyme disease will develop a rash, though sometimes multiple “bull’s-eye” rashes will occur. In some cases, other more severe symptoms may occur. Lyme disease can be successfully treated with antibiotics, but if left untreated, people can develop serious infections in the joints, heart, and nervous system.

How do I get Lyme disease?

People can get Lyme disease after being bitten by ticks carrying B. burgdorferi. Symptoms generally start within 3 days to several weeks following a tick bite. Black-legged ticks that carry Lyme disease are very small and can be hard to see. These tiny ticks bite mice infected with Lyme disease and then bite people or other animals, such as dogs and horses, passing the disease to them.

Each year, 7-23 cases of Lyme disease among Washington residents are reported. Most of these people acquired the disease following tick bites that occurred in the northeast and upper mid-west states, where Lyme disease occurs more commonly. However, there are usually a few cases (0-3) in Washington annually that result from tick bites in our state.

How can I protect myself from Lyme disease?

  • Whenever possible, you should avoid entering areas that are likely to be infested with ticks, particularly in spring and summer when nymphal ticks feed.
  • If you are in an area with ticks, you should wear light-colored clothing so that ticks can be spotted more easily and removed before becoming attached.
  • If you are in an area with ticks, wear long-sleeved shirts, and tuck your pants into socks. You may also want to wear high rubber boots (since ticks are usually located close to the ground).
  • Application of insect repellents containing DEET (n,n-diethyl-m-toluamide) to clothes and exposed skin, and permethrin (which kills ticks on contact) to clothes, should also help reduce the risk of tick attachment. DEET can be used safely on children and adults but should be applied according to the label’s instructions.
  • Since transmission of B. burgdorferi from an infected tick is unlikely to occur before 36 hours of tick attachment, check for ticks daily and remove them promptly. Embedded ticks should be removed by using fine-tipped tweezers. Cleanse the area with an antiseptic.
  • You can reduce the number of ticks around your home by removing leaf litter, brush, and wood-piles near your home and yard. By clearing trees and brush in your yard, you can reduce the likelihood that deer, rodents, and ticks will live there.